3D-PRINTED EXPERIMENTAL DEVICE FOR THE PRODUCTION OF BIODEGRADABLE FIBROUS MATERIALS FOR BIOMEDICAL SCAFFOLD PURPOSES VIA THE WET ELECTROSPINNING METHOD

1 KOVACICIN Jan
Co-authors:
1 HAUZEROVA Sarka 1 BEHALEK Lubos 1 LUKAS David 1 KUZELOVA KOSTAKOVA Eva
Institution:
1 Technical University of Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic, EU, Jan.Kovacicin@tul.cz
Conference:
13th International Conference on Nanomaterials - Research & Application, Orea Congress Hotel Brno, Czech Republic, EU, October 20 - 22, 2021
Proceedings:
Proceedings 13th International Conference on Nanomaterials - Research & Application
Pages:
304-310
ISBN:
978-80-88365-00-6
ISSN:
2694-930X
Published:
22nd November 2021
Proceedings of the conference have already been published in Scopus and we are waiting for evaluation and potential indexing in Web of Science.
Metrics:
173 views / 77 downloads
Abstract

The wet electrospinning method involves the use of a liquid instead of a solid or other type of collector for the collection of fabricated materials. This paper provides a description of an experimental laboratory wet electrospinning device, most of the various components of which were 3D printed by means of Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technology. The various morphologies of the biodegradable electrospun materials produced via the wet electrospinning technique are compared with those obtained via the classic needle electrospinning method employing SEM image analysis. The paper also provides a comparison with the structures and in-vitro viability of samples produced using the classic electrospinning approach and the wet electrospinning method with drying under both laboratory and freeze-drying conditions. The wet electrospinning freeze-drying method provides for the production of both high porosity and bulky materials. The in-vitro cell viability tests demonstrated that the wet electrospinning samples dried via the freeze-drying method evinced the highest rate of fibroblast proliferation. The novelty of the approach lies in its simplicity, the relatively low costs involved and the ease of the replication of the device for laboratory and low-quantity production purposes. Moreover, the various experiments conducted served both to prove the usefulness of the device and to determine that the resulting structure is suitable for cell growth, thus enabling the production of candidate materials for tissue engineering scaffolds.

Keywords: Wet electrospinning, scaffold, tissue engineering, 3D printer, cell viability

© This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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