PRODUCTION OF FIBROUS COMPOSITE MATERIAL WITH INCORPORATED ACTIVATED CARBON

1 HOLEC Pavel
Co-authors:
1 ULMAN Ivan 1 JIRKOVEC Radek 2 VANĚK Jakub
Institutions:
1 Technical University of Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic, EU, pavel.holec@tul.cz, ivan.ulman@tul.cz, radek.jirkovec@tul.cz
2 National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection, Milin, Czech Republic, EU, vanek@sujchbo.cz
Conference:
12th International Conference on Nanomaterials - Research & Application, Brno, Czech Republic, EU, October 21 - 23, 2020
Proceedings:
Proceedings 12th International Conference on Nanomaterials - Research & Application
Pages:
151-156
ISBN:
978-80-87294-98-7
ISSN:
2694-930X
Published:
28th December 2020
Proceedings of the conference were published in Web of Science and Scopus.
Metrics:
321 views / 168 downloads
Abstract

The increasing emphasis on human health and safety presupposes, among other things, the development of new safety technologies and aids that should protect people in high-risk occupations, such as firefighters, soldiers, paramedics, chemical plant workers or researchers themselves. One of the most common type of protective equipment is protective clothing. In the second half of the 20th century, garments made of composite textiles with incorporated activated carbon particles have been used for the sorption of hazardous gaseous or liquid substances.This work followed up on previous research and dealt with the design and production of a composite material with incorporated activated carbon, which was applied to the nonwoven material. The final product consisted of several layers: spun-bond, nonwoven needled fabric, activated carbon and nanofibers produced by polymer spinning technology using alternating current (AC spinning). The work also focused on the design of the order of individual layers, the method of application of activated carbon and the strengthening of the resulting composites. The finished material was finally subjected to tests of breathability, vapour permeability, loss of activated carbon particles and the passage of chemical warfare agents (simulants of sarin, soman or yperite). At the same time, the resulting composite was compared with the FOP-96 military protective clothing used today. The final product could serve as a protective layer for military purposes, firefighting, clothing for paramedics or the material for filtration.

Keywords: Chemical warfare agents, nanofibers, activated carbon, composite

© This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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