HYDROGEN DETECTION IN HIGH STRENGTH STEELS BY MEANS OF SKPFM

1 RUDOMILOVA Darya
Co-authors:
2 PROŠEK Tomáš 3 SCHIMO-AICHHORN Gabriela 4 MUHR Andreas 5 DUCHACZEK Hubert 6 LUCKENEDER Gerald
Institutions:
1 University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, EU, darya.rudomilova@vscht.cz
2 University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, EU, tomas.prosek@vscht.cz
3 CEST Competence Center for Electrochemical Surface Technology, Linz, Austria, EU, gabriela.schimo@cest.at
4 voestalpine Stahl GmbH, Linz, Austria, EU, Andreas.Muhr@voestalpine.com
5 voestalpine Stahl GmbH, Linz, Austria, EU, Hubert.Duchaczek@voestalpine.com
6 voestalpine Stahl GmbH, Linz, Austria, EU, Gerald.Luckeneder@voestalpine.com
Conference:
27th International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials, Hotel Voronez I, Brno, Czech Republic, EU, May 23rd - 25th 2018
Proceedings:
Proceedings 27th International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials
Pages:
572-577
ISBN:
978-80-87294-84-0
ISSN:
2694-9296
Published:
24th October 2018
Proceedings of the conference were published in Web of Science and Scopus.
Metrics:
16 views / 8 downloads
Abstract

Growing efforts for weight and gas emission reduction in automotive industry led to development of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with a very good strength-to-ductility balance. However, AHSS can be prone to hydrogen embrittlement, which leads to the degradation of mechanical properties, mainly ductility, in the presence of hydrogen. It can limit the applicability of AHSS for the car body construction. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the risks associated with hydrogen absorption in AHSS during corrosion processes.In this work, a novel technique for hydrogen detection was used. Scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) enables measurement of Volta potential difference with very high spatial resolution. SKPFM measurements of changes in Volta potential difference were performed on an AHSS grade in order to study hydrogen entry and absorption as a result of atmospheric corrosion and electrochemical hydrogen charging.

Keywords: High strength steels, hydrogen, SKPFM
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